#FlaPanthers Rough Up #Blackhawks

By Bill Whitehead

SUNRISE — In a battle of first-place teams Friday night at BB&T Center, the Florida Panthers, atop the Atlantic Division by a single point before the puck dropped, decided on an interesting approach in facing the defending Stanley Cup champion Chicago Blackhawks.

They decided to get physical.  “Let’s get physical” ala Olivia Newton-John. The “Pow!”, “Bam!” and “Zow!” of the old Batman series from the 1960s starring the incredibly great, talented Adam West.

A 4-0 thorough whipping of Chicago later, spurred on by a pair of goals by the defense, 27 saves by Roberto Luongo, strong play on all four lines and a complete team effort, and the Florida Panthers (27-15-5) suddenly don’t look like the team that lost to a mediocre Edmonton club on Monday.

Much of it came from the physical nature of Florida, who will never be mistaken for the punishing L.A. Kings, but who can bring the lumber and lay the wood when they need to.

Such as defenseman Erik Gudbranson’s smash of Finnish forward Teuvo Teravainen in the second and oversleeping left winger Richard Panik in the third. Plus Alex Petrovic’s bout with edgy Blackhawk Andrew Desjardins.

Florida outhit and bruised the Blackhawks 27-18, including a game-high five each by Gudbranson and Petrovic.

“Yeah, that (Gudranson hit) was a good hit, that was a good hit,” said Shawn Thornton, whose blind backhander in the third period nearly beat Chicago’s Scott Darling for a goal that would surely have brought the house down.

“Petro stepping up. We’re not an overly physical team, but we genuinely really like each other in this locker room and we have each other’s back. That stuff’s never been a concern in here, win or lose.”

After his post-game treatment, I caught Gudbranson, who ranked his hit right up there with his blow on Taylor Hall in Edmonton in terms of being his season’s best. As Teravainen entered the offensive end with the puck from the right side in front of Chicago’s bench, Gudbranson leveled the 5-foot-11 No. 86, who went head over heels covered in a swirl of curvy 8s and 6s on his white sweater.

“That’s kind of what I mold my game after,” said Gudbranson when I made the reference to the Kings. “I really enjoy hitting, almost as much as scoring, and I haven’t done much of that. I make my name known that way.

“The ref came up to me afterward and said it was absolutely textbook. I got him through the shoulders, and his head was down and I caught him off-guard. (That hit) or Hall right now. The Hall one was definitely harder. This one was a little more exciting to see him flying through the air.

“We’ve got a lot of skill on this team, but I don’t think at any point we’ve let ourselves get pushed around. If the game gets physical, that’s fine. That’s hockey, and guys are ready to step up.”

Even Luongo joined the fray in the second, roughing Desjardins after the Blackhawks’ left winger ventured into the crease following Luongo’s 14th save.

“There was a little bit of a spear after the whistle and I wasn’t too happy about it,” said Luongo, who authored his 72nd career shutout. “That’s stuff that happens during the game. I really don’t want to go down 4-on-4 in that situation, but I was a little upset with myself there and lost control.”

It’s a skill game at times, but on a night when Florida did almost everything right, was clearly by far the better team through 60 minutes and caught the champs on the second game of a back-to-back, the Panthers brought the hits and let the Blackhawks know they were there.

Old-time hockey style.

**Follow Bill on Twitter @BillWhiteheadFL and in newspapers at TCPalm.com

 

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Ex-Cat Goc Sees Improvement in Young #FlaPanthers

By Bill Whitehead

SUNRISE – Pittsburgh Penguins center Marcel Goc isn’t surprised by the development of the Florida Panthers and the position they’re in.

“They played well against us (Saturday). They came hard at us with a strong forecheck, and every time they had a chance they threw the puck at the net. They tried to create trouble for us,” said the former Panther Monday following morning skate.

“But I see a few faces I don’t recognize from when I played (there).”

Goc will play in his first game back at BB&T Center after being traded Mar. 5 for third- and fifth-round picks. The German center said he isn’t shocked at how quickly Florida (14-9-8) has transformed from lottery team to a potential playoff club.

“Their young guys – Barky and Bjugstad – they play well, and they try to play them a lot so they get more confident,” Goc said. “What are they, 21, 22ss or something like that? I think they have a bright future ahead of them. They have more consistency from last year than they did in their first year, but that’s the case with everybody. They’re going to be a big part of this organization.

“I worked on faceoffs with them a lot together. It’s funny taking them across from them now.”

Goc has three points (1-2) in his 30 games played with the Penguins this year.

MORE MUMPS – Pittsburgh, who has been saddled with a bout of the mumps, sent three more players home before the game against Florida. Centers Steve Downie and Brandon Sutter and goalie Thomas Greiss all flew back to Pittsburgh to undergo further testing.

Pittsburgh iced just 18 skaters at morning skate, with goaltending coach Mike Bales tending net opposite Marc-Andre Fleury. As of morning skate, the Penguins featured 11 forwards, seven defensemen and one goalie.

The Penguins called up goalie Jeff Zatkoff from Wilkes-Barre in the afternoon to back up Fleury. The AHL team last played Saturday and won’t playing again until this Saturday.

FEISTY FOLLOW-UP? – The two clubs combined for 76 penalty minutes Saturday night in Pittsburgh’s 3-1 home win, but Florida coach Gerard Gallant and players from both teams said they didn’t expect a flare-up in what should be Florida’s biggest home crowd of the season. The Panthers racked up 32 penalty minutes, the most accumulated since 37 against Toronto on April 10, 2014.

“What ‘tonight’?” Gallant answered when asked if Florida would miss Shawn Thornton’s toughness. “We’re playing the best team in the league, and I don’t think it’ll be about toughness tonight. It’s going to be about working hard, speed, competing and playing hard. You don’t see those games anymore.”

Emotional Florida winger Scottie Upshall, usually in the middle of the fray, received just two minutes for tripping Evgeni Malkin. Upshall and his teammates said staying penalty-free was more important than settling the score in a playoff-style matchup.

“We hope to stay out of the box. Penalties are going to hurt you. I actually like the 2-game series. I kind of think they’re fun. I like the way they lead up. It’s a little mini playoffs series, and guys really hone in on the little things,” Upshall said.

“We know that Pittsburgh’s a great team and if you give them power plays they’re going to win. We need to stay disciplined tonight and play hard. That (killing off six Pittsburgh power plays) isn’t going to happen in back-to-back games against those guys.”

Nick Bjugstad likes playing in the high-tension games where it gets a little chippy, and even had a few in college at Minnesota.

“It was more gritty than I expected it to be…That game was just more intense. This game might not be as intense, you just never really know. You never expect something like that last game, but they’re fun because everyone’s into it, everyone’s battling,” he said.

“We’d always get into it with North Dakota, but there’s no fighting so that changes (things).”

Added former Barrie Colts defenseman Aaron Ekblad: “Obviously, you want to keep calm and try to get the game back in your control. You want to find a calm center to your game and not take calculated risks.

The nose is just fine

The nose is just fine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I didn’t have many games like that in the OHL, maybe one or two a year. Usually against London or someone like that, but not even close to the caliber it is in the NHL.”

Follow Bill Whitehead on Twitter @BillWhiteheadFL and in Scripps newspapers online at TCPalm.com