#FlaPanthers: Coaching Change Inevitable

By BILL WHITEHEAD

We’ve been told for a long time that a picture is worth a thousand words. With that in mind, the images that we saw Sunday night about 10:00 must be worth at least 100,000 words.

Or maybe something closer to epic proportions, somewhere in the neighborhood of War and Peace.

There was Gerard Gallant, bags in hand, grabbing his own cab. One Carolina Hurricanes employee was assisting him, which accentuated the matter even more.

In his time of departure from the Florida Panthers and lowest point within the organization, Gallant’s sole help was a worker from a former Southeast Division rival.

In the high stakes game of Optics, which is enormous these days (Google “National Election” images), the Panthers came off looking terrible on a Sunday night.

Worse than the worst segment ever of 60 Minutes. Or if you’re over 45, the most woeful melodramatic episode ever of Murder, She Wrote.

Rumors had been swirling like a furiously forming funnel cloud that Gallant’s days in Florida could be coming to a close. A 3- or 4-game losing streak might just be Gallant’s last straw, but one loss? One particularly bad loss to a mediocre  Hurricanes team that is extremely young and played most of the game without its top center?

Seems extreme, no?

Unabashedly, I admit to liking the Panthers. I’ve covered them since Pete DeBoer’s first season, and my duties have expanded greatly in that time beyond anything I had ever imagined.

When they lose, it stings some. Hey, prosperity’s a good thing, and business is better for everyone when the Cats are winning like last season, breaking records and being the lead NHL story on occasion.

When my wife saw me sulking a bit and asked, “Is someone upset because his team lost?”, my eight-year-old son — the real hockey fan in the house — looked over his shoulder from his computer hockey game and set the record straight.

“Everyone gets upset when their team loses,” he said simply.

Apparently that goes for Florida’s management, too. And it literally is their team.

That said, Sunday night won’t go down as one of the better moments for the Florida Panthers.

Gallant was a great guy to work with. Even when angry or perturbed by something, that grin seemed to widen and those teeth flashed as he prepared to deliver the reasons why. He didn’t single out players often, but he didn’t cover up the mistakes that were made either.

He’s appreciated around the league, and the perception of him is a good, strong one. The media likes him, and he’s viewed as a good hockey guy.

If you’re setting the scene at home, management will be playing the role of the Big Bad Wolf in this story, folks.

But the bottom line is this: There was a gulf that existed between Gallant and management. Gallant bristled at some of the decisions made by the brass, but their final one that concerned him was inevitable.

It could have happened last night or in Chicago or Detroit later in the week, but it was coming. That funnel cloud finally formed over Gallant, and he couldn’t escape it.

The growing discontent between Gallant and management would never go away.

Now it’s on ownership, though, and they’re just as culpable as Gallant.

They secured the future by making long-term decisions and locking up the core. That’s great. But with over $5 million left in salary cap, they failed to address the present state of secondary scoring, which has usually been a problem for the Panthers as long I’ve been here.

Particularly of issue is the third line and the team’s offense, which ranks in the NHL’s lower half in almost every significant category.

Some players on the third line are rookies, castoffs, borderline AHLers or some with marginal skills that should be playing on the fourth line. With Nick Bjugstad out, Gallant tinkered with that line incessantly, trying to make something out of it and establishing some consistency, but he couldn’t.

While spitballing some hot stove talk in July, a colleague and I often talked about many possible free-agent acquisitions. Two that came up frequently were Austrians Michael Grabner and Thomas Vanek.

An energetic player like the former 30-goal Michael Grabner or proven scorer like Vanek were both available on the cheap to shore up the third line, even before Bjugstad’s late preseason injury.

Both wingers are having standout years. Grabner has 12 goals and is his usual reliable self on the PK, and he’s a ridiculous plus-20 for the Rangers. Vanek has been nicked up a bit but is almost a point a game for Detroit.

The Rangers paid less than $2 million per Grabner, Detroit slightly more for Vanek. Meanwhile, the Panthers still have a hole at wing.

One of these seasoned vets could have brought production to a line that had gaping holes on both wings and kept Bjugstad in the middle, but management hope a youngster would step up.

It was a gamble that hasn’t paid off.

Grabs or Vanek would have helped offensively and pushed players getting third-line minutes to  the fourth line, too, making it more productive in the process.

I didn’t want Gallant necessarily, but I grew to like him. No one asked me, but I had my sights on Guy Boucher and his Mad Scientist approach to coaching.

Boucher took the Lightning to within one goal of the Stanley Cup Final with a goalie tandem of Dwayne Roloson, Dan Ellis (remember him?) and Mike Smith. Think about that for a minute.

Now Boucher is in Ottawa, the Senators are in second in the Atlantic Division and GM Tom Rowe is the Panthers’ new bench boss.

It’s quite an ascendancy from Rowe’s stint in the AHL to Florida’s front office and now to the bench, albeit in an interim role. The onus will be on him to get the team, which is likely a little ticked off at losing Gallant, back on task of chasing Montreal,  Ottawa and Tampa for a divisional spot.

Last night was a lot about Gallant — those images, again, were bad and will be played out too much for anyone’s liking — and the players will always have to own up to their play on the ice.

But now with Rowe coaching the team, this is mostly about the brass, less on the players and not on Gallant at all.

It’s on management now.

Follow Bill on Twitter @BillWhiteheadFL and in newspapers at TCPalm.com

#FlaPanthers Worthy of All the Attention

By Bill Whitehead

When the club you’re covering is riding an 11-game winning streak and has suddenly become the media darling in a sport that’s not headquartered in the U.S., there’s plenty to write about. Puh-lenty. Here are just a few Florida Panthers storylines scribes could flesh out today:

A franchise-record/NLH-high winning streak, a franchise-record road winning streak, a 17-3-0 run in their last 20, winning without their top goal scorer for most of the streak, 21-3-2 when scoring first, 15-2-0 when leading after the first period, 13-5-2 when being outshot, trailing for just 14:02 during the run, 5-1 in shootouts, allowing just 32 goals in their last 20 games, sweeping a six-game homestand, leading the NHL in defense, surging to the top of the Atlantic Division and leading by five points, watching them lead NHL On the Fly then being ticked off when they don’t, getting All-Star selections, any Panthers player, even the coach.

Whew.

It’s dizzying what a person can sit down and write about these days with this club. For once, the Florida stories from the second half of this season won’t be about which player to trade to a contender, calling up some hot prospects or analyzing the upcoming draft.

Actually, a couple of observations stand out over the last couple of games Florida has won – winning ugly, the defense and the top line.

If this were, say, the 2011-12 season – the last playoff run – I think it would be a pretty fair assumption to say that Florida would not have beaten either Minnesota or Ottawa in their last two games. These Panthers, the owners of that 11-game streak, brought what amounted to their C or C- game in both of those.

After Jaromir Jagr scored in the first minute against Minnesota, Florida was shut down for most of the game until Jagr unleashed a shot from his heyday in the 90s for his 132nd game-winner, an NHL record, to make a winner out of a strong Al Montoya.

Same with Ottawa. The Panthers scored two quick ones, looked wide awake and appeared ready to blow the Senators right out of the Canada’s capital, yet the Cats had to hang on at the end like they did against the Wild. In fact, Florida had just 16 shots against an Ottawa team that allows 33 per game, most in the league, in a building Florida doesn’t win in often.

Four years ago Florida probably would’ve been taken to overtime after a late goal and perhaps lost in a shootout in both games; the 2011-12 team was 6-11 in shootouts and had 18 overtime losses, earning important “loser points” as they’ve become known as. And that’s no knock on those Cats, who won the Southeast Division. It’s just who they were.

However, the current Panthers improved to 16-2-2 when leading after two periods and 13-3-4 in one-goal games: They hold on to late leads and generally don’t let tight contests go to overtime, and that’s all about coach Gerard Gallant’s defensive system.

Defensively, the Cats have stonewalled opponents. What Roberto Luongo did to Kyle Turris on three occasions and once to Mika Zibanejad was almost a criminal act in Canada. File it under “Goal Theft.” Alex Petrovic’s glitch aside – those plays are going to happen, especially with youngsters – the blue line has been rock solid while the forwards have battled, too.

The top line is simply better, as well.

Sasha Barkov with the third goal on a flip past sprawling good guy Craig Anderson provided a comfort zone. In fact, getting the puck in the hands of Jagr, Barkov and Jonathan Huberdeau is always a fine option. Stephen Weiss, Kris Versteeg and Tomas Fleischmann comprised a very good first line; the current one is a great top line consisting of three elite offensive players who can bail Florida out even when they aren’t clicking on all cylinders.

And as for winning ugly when you’re not at your best and somehow boarding the team bus with two points when you were likely driving away with none?

That’s what playoff teams do.

**Follow Bill on Twitter @BillWhiteheadFL and in newspapers at TCPalm.com

#FlaPanthers Win Again, 2-0, in Carolina

By Bill Whitehead

RALEIGH, N.C. – If you’re a fan of The Walking Dead, the mention of the name Terminus conjures awful imagery, some of the most graphic in the popular series.

Without giving away any spoilers from Seasons 4 and 5 for those in the process of binge-watching during the holidays – “TWD at Christmas, you say? I’m all for that!” – let’s just say Terminus held the prospect of hope and forcefully snatched it away like Lucy with the football from the oncoming, place-kicking Charlie Brown.

This hockey barn known as PNC Arena has been a Terminus of sorts for the Panthers since the start of the 1999-00 season. Carolina held a 30-9-4 mark against the Cats before Friday night’s final meeting of the season in the Tar Heel State’s capital.

Back in the day, nothing good ever happened here. Bad play, mysterious diving that led to Carolina power plays and poor results were the characteristics of the Panthers’ play in my home state.

That all started to change during the 2011-12 season when Florida won two out of three in their Southeast Division-winning campaign. In fact, since then the Panthers have gone 4-4-0 in the building once known as the RBC Center.

Only defensemen Dmitry Kulikov, Erik Gudbranson and Brian Campbell – Florida’s three longest-tenured players – were around for that playoff season, but rumors of the Cats’ struggles in Carolina surely surfaced when the club pulled up near the North Carolina State Fairgrounds.

Not so much anymore, though. And let’s bump that record to 5-4-0 while we’re at it.

Willie Mitchell’s one-timer from the bottom of the right circle – yep, you read that right – off a slick pass from Jonathan Huberdeau, Roberto Luongo’s 70th career shutout and Reilly Smith’s empty-net goal with Carolina’s Cam Ward on the bench were all that was needed as the Panthers (17-12-4) ran their road record to 10-6-2 with a 2-0 win.

“We’re just playing good hockey right now,” said Gudbranson, part of a blue line that limited the Hurricanes, who had 26 goals in their last six games, to nothing on the scoreboard while Luongo was rock steady and made every stop when something did emerge.

“We’re coming to the rink with the same mindset and preparation every single game. There’s a confidence in this room, even in a tough game like that. Kind of a boring game, a chess match. We knew if we stuck with it that at the end of the day we’d come away with two points.”

By no means was this win pretty, but it was pretty effective.

Coach Gerard Gallant gave credit to Luongo for making 24 enormous saves against a team that had been finding the twine often.

“You never tell your team to play defensive hockey, but they didn’t have a lot in the tank and were a little tired. The puck was bouncing quite a bit, so there weren’t many offensive chances,” Gallant said of Florida, winners of their last eight of 10 on the road.

“Those points tonight were big. We were 4-0 on the last (road) trip and lost the last game. We wanted to try and finish off this trip the right way.”

In a building that thankfully doesn’t hold the Terminus-like dread anymore.

EMPTY-NETTER: It was my first time back at PNC since April of 2008 when Chad LaRose’s hat trick led Carolina to a 6-2 win over Tampa, and it was nice to be back in the building. As much as Florida takes grief for its attendance, Carolina has been just as much in trouble throughout the season. However, Friday night’s crowd of 10,511 a week before Christmas wasn’t too bad for the Canes, whose foothold as the official hockey club of both Carolinas is tenuous at best, especially for a team that has a Stanley Cup championship under its belt.

**Follow Bill on Twitter @BillWhiteheadFL and in newspapers at TCPalm.com**

#FlaPanthers Jimmy Hayes Has to Move Those Feet

By Bill Whitehead

SUNRISE – Wednesday morning – and perhaps it was really Monday night – could have been better for Florida Panthers forward Jimmy Hayes.

Hayes, tied for fourth in team scoring with nine points, was one of the last Panthers to head off the ice at BB&T Center, strolling in hot and sweaty along with defenseman Colby Robak, as Florida wrapped up morning skate in preparation for its game against former Southeastern Division rival Carolina.

The extra skating meant the pair would likely be scratched for the 7:30 game against the Hurricanes (6-11-3). Coach Gerard Gallant said Scottie Upshall (lower body) would likely be out “a week for sure” due to his hard hit into the boards Monday night. Upshall was wearing a walking boot Tuesday. Derek MacKenzie, who felt flu-like Tuesday, was expected to play.

Gallant suggested Hayes’ potential scratch stemmed from effort.

“He’s a guy who sat in the stands the first few games, and he’s played hard for us,” said Gallant. “But we’ve got to keep on Jimmy and make sure he’s working. He’s a big guy. When he’s effective, he skates hard and moves his feet and is an important guy for us.”

And when he’s not moving those feet anchoring his mammoth frame?

“Everybody’s different. Some guys you have to push them a little harder,” Gallant said. “For me, I talk to Jimmy quite a bit and say, ‘When you’re playing well you’re moving your feet.’ These big guys look lazy out there at times…We keep telling him, ‘You’re a good hockey player and a goal scorer. Get to the net, move to the net and make sure you’re working hard.’

“He’s working hard, and he’s a good kid. We like what we’re seeing from him. Goals are scored around the blue paint. When you work hard to get there and you’re a big-bodied guy and tough to move, you’ve got to pay a price to score goals.”

Hayes is tied with Brad Boyes in points (9) despite having played in only 13 of the 19 games for the Panthers (7-6-6). Jussi Jokinen leads with 12 points, followed by Nick Bjugstad and rookie Aaron Ekblad with 11 each.

Hayes, originally drafted by Toronto, and teammate Dylan Olsen, were traded to Florida last Nov. 14 in a deal that sent Kris Versteeg back to Chicago. Hayes was playing in Rockford (AHL) at the time but saw the opportunity in Florida.

“It was a new team and a chance to establish myself. I’m grateful and happy for that opportunity. I feel like I’m a full-time NHLer now and starting to contribute the way I want to. It’s good not to be the guy walking around on eggshells not sure where he’s going to be every day. I never say I’m complacent, but it’s good to have a role on an NHL team,” said Hayes, who missed six of Florida’s first eight games in October.

The Boston College alum said he knows he has to play near the blue paint.

“It’s where I’ve been my whole career being 6-foot-5, so I just had to take hold of (the spot) as a pro. Not many guys go there and stuff, so I was able to establish a spot there,” he said.

Vincent Trocheck and Tomas Fleischmann, both scratched Monday, are expected to be in the lineup in place of Hayes and Upshall, while Olsen replaces Robak.

Follow Bill Whitehead on Twitter @BillWhiteheadFL and in Scripps newspapers online at TCPalm.com

#FlaPanthers: Five Things Learned in Five Games

By Bill Whitehead

We’re only five games deep into the 2014-15 season, but the Florida Panthers have already given their fans some dire concern but with glimpses of hope, moments of worry tempered by anticipation. A 1-2-2 start has alternately been decent but disappointing (Tampa Bay), abjectly miserable (New Jersey), utterly embarrassing (Ottawa, in a home attendance “sit-anywhere-you-want-to, hell-nobody’s-here” Internet/Twitter mess), and good-but-could’ve-been-better (win over Buffalo, shootout loss to Washington). It’s just a five-game snippet, but something can be and has been learned in that time.

Here are five observations over five games, some positive, some not:

 

  1. The defense is better than expected. The Cats gave up five goals against the Devils, but throw those out (I know, they all count) and the defense has allowed just five goals in four games, excluding the shootout marker. Of course, a large part of that lies with Roberto Luongo, who blanked Buffalo for coach Gerard Gallant’s first win, and Al Montoya, who has been exceptional in both appearances, though he failed in the shootout against the Caps. Granted two of those wins are against mediocre Ottawa and awful Buffalo clubs, but Tampa Bay and Washington are likely playoff teams. This defense should keep Florida in many close games.
  2. The top six can’t be any worse. The top two lines of Aleksander Barkov, Jussi Jokinen, Brad Boyes, Nick Bjugstad, Jonathan Huberdeau and Scottie Upshall have combined for exactly four points, and only two – Huberdeau and Boyes – have goals. Worst still, top centers Barkov and Bjugstad are scoreless, as is Jokinen, the club’s major offensive acquisition in the offseason. Jokinen, who has shown some nice passing, was the lone missed shot in the shootout in DC. No team wins in the NHL consistently without production from its top six.
  3. Willie Mitchell has been well worth the money. The 2-time Stanley Cup winner has been a solid addition to the blue line, adding a calming presence and making all the small plays necessary of a player who has competed in over 900 NHL games. He’s also served as a fine replacement for Ed Jovanovski, another defenseman who was the previous captain. Another trait the two blueliners share: They will speak at length – at incredibly fantastic length – about their play and the state of the game or team. Mitchell’s value will continue to increase as strengthens relationships with his defensive unit and learns his teammates’ characteristics. A great stabilizing, experienced addition by GM Dale Tallon.
  4. Brandon Pirri must play. A team that struggles so mightily to score and appears goal-challenged most of the time cannot – simply can’t — repeatedly scratch the one player on the club who can snipe a bit. Shoot first instead of pass? That’s Pirri. One-time a pass, an amazing feat for this group? That too is Pirri. Win draws, push the play forward and put the puck on net? Pirri. Clearly, he has some faults that Gallant doesn’t like. At the Philadelphia draft, one Western Conference beat writer told me Pirri felt like he deserved more playing time in Chicago’s top six and was upset he wasn’t getting it, so maybe that’s why he was expendable to the talented Blackhawks. However, the Cats need him and must have him in the lineup.
  5. Aaron Ekblad belongs here, as does Derek MacKenzie. Ekblad, the 18-year-old rookie and No. 1 overall pick, has transitioned well into the NHL and has shown a flare for offense. He’s defensively responsible, solid in all aspects of his game and likes to shoot the puck – just like he repeated to us in Philadelphia – and should be here for the long haul this season. MacKenzie, a fourth line scrapper, wins face-offs and is as gritty as a Burning Man Festival attendee after a week spent in the Nevada desert. He hits and hits and hits, and physicality is infectious along a team’s bench. Florida already appears to be a much more physical club than in previous years. A large part of that credit goes to the feisty MacKenzie.

Also, the season is not over. The hockey world appeared bad after New Jersey humiliated Florida last weekend, but it’s equally bad or worse with other teams. Edmonton, a team loaded with top talent, has scored six more goals than Florida but is 0-4-1 and has one point. Buffalo is as bad and dismal as a horrible winter storm in western New York, and Carolina’s not much better. As for scoring deficiency, Winnipeg tallied one goal over a three-game stretch and has two in its last four games.

Plenty of hockey remains in this season, but it’s up to Gallant and the real quality drafted talent – Bjugstad, Barkov and Huberdeau – plus high-dollar acquisitions like Dave Bolland and Jokinen to give Florida the offensive punch it needs and turn these close losses into wins.

Follow Bill Whitehead on Twitter @BillWhiteheadFL and in Scripps newspapers online at TCPalm.com

Tallon sticks to word, Panthers draft Hawryluk

By Bill Whitehead

PHILADELPHIA – Brandon Wheat Kings right winger Jayce Hawryluk has only been to Florida once, but he hopes to bring his fiery style of play to the Sunshine State in the near future.

Hawryluk, 18, met with Dale Tallon on Friday before the draft, and the GM told the Manitoba native that if he were still on the board at No. 32 in the second round, the Cats would be all over him. On Saturday, Hawryluk – plus a few projected first-round players who had slipped to the second round – was still there. Tallon and Florida honored their word.

“They contacted me (yesterday) and said, ‘You’re our guy at 32.’ They kept to their promise, 100 percent. I appreciate, and it means a lot,” said Hawryluk, who led Brandon with 64 points (24-40) in 59 games on a team that also featured John Quenneville, the first round’s final selection by New Jersey Friday night.

“They’re a good, young team and I know some of the players. I know Colby Robak, he comes from near where I am. He trains at the same gym.”

 

JaceHawryluk

Hawryluk lives in Roblin (population 3,284) but was born across the border in Yorkton, Sask., because Roblin didn’t have a hospital. The town held a draft party for him.

“My work ethic,” Hawryluk said when asked what his biggest asset was. “I describe my playing style as a Brad Marchand or Brendan Gallagher type of player…(New Florida Panthers coach Gerard Gallant), I heard he played a lot like me back in the day, with a chip on his shoulder. He’s a great coach and I heard he’s a great guy.

“Obviously, you want to go in with the confidence that you can be a first-round type of pick. I had that confidence and this is a dream come true for me. It’s a great accomplishment.”

Hawryluk said being on the receiving end of sibling rivalries, many of them hockey oriented in a very competitive environment, likely contributed to his style of play.

“I’m a fiery guy, you know. I’ve always been like that my whole life and don’t expect it to change. I play with a chip on my shoulder and I’m a tenacious guy every shift. I have three older brothers; that could’ve helped it,” he said

As for Florida?

“I went to Disney World when I was 13 maybe. It was hot. It’s been awhile, but I’m excited to go back. I don’t mind (the heat),” Hawryluk said.

The knock on Hawryluk has been his 5-foot-10, 192-pound build, but his tenacity and work ethic may be worth the difference and more. It worked for Marchand and Gallagher, smaller players who have earned the reputation as being pest-like.

Personality wise, there’s a ton to like about the kid. You could say he’s kind of fiery during the interview process as well, or at least direct and kind of amped up. I like the pick mainly because it sort of resembles the Trocheck selection from Minnesota in 2011 – a team-leading scorer who is gritty and does the little things well, though Vince was never rated this highly.

With some good talent falling to the second round, Tallon must really like Hawryluk because he made a promise to the kid and kept his word.

Follow Bill Whitehead on Twitter @BillWhiteheadFL and in Scripps newspapers online at TCPalm.com

 

Gallant’s Hiring Another Step in Right Direction

By Bill Whitehead

Florida Panthers general manager Dale Tallon has had a major task at hand since the Cats closed a miserable season that left them with the second-worst record in the Eastern Conference, primarily because of a defense with as many holes in it as a bullet-riddled car after a mob hit and an offense that simply couldn’t shoot straight.

Tallon’s task is four-part, and as of Saturday afternoon, the first two steps were officially in the books.

The first move was a quick one, the firing of Peter Horachek shortly after the season ended. His sacking was timely and had a clean-cut, surgical precision to it. There was no hemming or hawing over keeping Horachek, a class act who did his best in a tough situation by coming onboard when Kevin Dineen was released early in the season. Initially during Horachek’s reign, the Cats had jump and appeared improved, perhaps trying to impress their new bench boss. But over a larger sample in the long haul, Florida was just as bad with Horachek. Losing talented rookie Aleksander Barkov to injury was an unfair loss, but the special teams were atrocious, particularly the power play, which had no leader, no quarterback, no direction and just appeared a pointless waste of two minutes.

That description of the power play also described Horachek’s coaching tenure – aimless and floundering at sea with no way of getting back to shore. Tallon had to let Horachek go. Florida fans are unsure of the new hire, Prince Edward Island’s Gerard Gallant, but how deflating would it have been to start camp in a few months under the helm of Horachek, who had accomplished so little? At least there’s a sense of  “Hey, maybe Gallant can be the guy” and provide stability for a club that’s had 13 coaches over two decades.

Imagine how critical the media and fans would have been of an organization that kept Horachek as coach and failed to make a run in the offseason at Dan Bylsma, Gallant and other fine candidates like Bill Peters and Willie Desjardins.

The hiring of Gallant, 50, was a meticulous process that kept dragging out, leaving many feeling like they were watching some cliffhanger episode of their favorite TV show each day. Most wanted ex-Pens coach Bylsma. True, he would have brought a strong pedigree and perhaps giving Florida an inside track during free agency with players like Jussi Jokinen, Matt Niskanen and Brooks Orpik, but it just didn’t work out, whether he asked for too much money or Florida held the purse strings too tightly. There’s a strong chance Bylsma won’t be coaching at all next season, and Vancouver and Pittsburgh still have no coach.

So bringing in Gallant – step 2 of the rebuilding process (I hate that word, let’s go with “the strengthening process” because this isn’t really a rebuild) – was also the right call. From every account I’ve read and people I’ve talked to, Gallant is nothing but a winner and a player’s coach. Sure, he didn’t win in Columbus, but Scotty Bowman wouldn’t have been successful coaching that bad roster for an organization in flux at the time. As I tweeted yesterday, there’s a sense that Gallant’s players will do anything for him – run through a wall for him – and that feeling wasn’t prevalent with the Cats as they skated through the motions under Horachek.

Gallant is also intense and fiery yet humble. In all I’ve encountered, I’ve heard nothing negative, no “Watch out when he does this” or “He gets over his head when …” warnings. Former players and coaches, including P.K. Subban and Doug MacLean, have been effusive in their praise of Gallant. And fans of the Canadiens have lamented losing him on the bench.

So it’s two steps down, two to go for Tallon.

The third will take place at the draft in Philadelphia, where the GM will do everything he can to fortify this team. He will likely do it by selecting one exceptional prospect like Aaron Ekblad, Sam Reinhart or Sam Bennett with the top pick or another in a trade, maybe with a Canadian team that covets one of those three and is willing to give up a handsome bounty for him. The final step starts July 1 with free agency, just three days after the draft.

For now, Tallon’s 2-for-2 and batting a thousand in the offseason.

Follow Bill Whitehead on Twitter @BillWhiteheadFL and in Scripps newspapers online at TCPalm.com