#FlaPanthers Worthy of All the Attention

By Bill Whitehead

When the club you’re covering is riding an 11-game winning streak and has suddenly become the media darling in a sport that’s not headquartered in the U.S., there’s plenty to write about. Puh-lenty. Here are just a few Florida Panthers storylines scribes could flesh out today:

A franchise-record/NLH-high winning streak, a franchise-record road winning streak, a 17-3-0 run in their last 20, winning without their top goal scorer for most of the streak, 21-3-2 when scoring first, 15-2-0 when leading after the first period, 13-5-2 when being outshot, trailing for just 14:02 during the run, 5-1 in shootouts, allowing just 32 goals in their last 20 games, sweeping a six-game homestand, leading the NHL in defense, surging to the top of the Atlantic Division and leading by five points, watching them lead NHL On the Fly then being ticked off when they don’t, getting All-Star selections, any Panthers player, even the coach.

Whew.

It’s dizzying what a person can sit down and write about these days with this club. For once, the Florida stories from the second half of this season won’t be about which player to trade to a contender, calling up some hot prospects or analyzing the upcoming draft.

Actually, a couple of observations stand out over the last couple of games Florida has won – winning ugly, the defense and the top line.

If this were, say, the 2011-12 season – the last playoff run – I think it would be a pretty fair assumption to say that Florida would not have beaten either Minnesota or Ottawa in their last two games. These Panthers, the owners of that 11-game streak, brought what amounted to their C or C- game in both of those.

After Jaromir Jagr scored in the first minute against Minnesota, Florida was shut down for most of the game until Jagr unleashed a shot from his heyday in the 90s for his 132nd game-winner, an NHL record, to make a winner out of a strong Al Montoya.

Same with Ottawa. The Panthers scored two quick ones, looked wide awake and appeared ready to blow the Senators right out of the Canada’s capital, yet the Cats had to hang on at the end like they did against the Wild. In fact, Florida had just 16 shots against an Ottawa team that allows 33 per game, most in the league, in a building Florida doesn’t win in often.

Four years ago Florida probably would’ve been taken to overtime after a late goal and perhaps lost in a shootout in both games; the 2011-12 team was 6-11 in shootouts and had 18 overtime losses, earning important “loser points” as they’ve become known as. And that’s no knock on those Cats, who won the Southeast Division. It’s just who they were.

However, the current Panthers improved to 16-2-2 when leading after two periods and 13-3-4 in one-goal games: They hold on to late leads and generally don’t let tight contests go to overtime, and that’s all about coach Gerard Gallant’s defensive system.

Defensively, the Cats have stonewalled opponents. What Roberto Luongo did to Kyle Turris on three occasions and once to Mika Zibanejad was almost a criminal act in Canada. File it under “Goal Theft.” Alex Petrovic’s glitch aside – those plays are going to happen, especially with youngsters – the blue line has been rock solid while the forwards have battled, too.

The top line is simply better, as well.

Sasha Barkov with the third goal on a flip past sprawling good guy Craig Anderson provided a comfort zone. In fact, getting the puck in the hands of Jagr, Barkov and Jonathan Huberdeau is always a fine option. Stephen Weiss, Kris Versteeg and Tomas Fleischmann comprised a very good first line; the current one is a great top line consisting of three elite offensive players who can bail Florida out even when they aren’t clicking on all cylinders.

And as for winning ugly when you’re not at your best and somehow boarding the team bus with two points when you were likely driving away with none?

That’s what playoff teams do.

**Follow Bill on Twitter @BillWhiteheadFL and in newspapers at TCPalm.com

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